Our New Climate Reality : Fresh Air New York Times science writer David Wallace-Wells brings us some new thinking on global warming — and it isn't all bad. He's been called an alarmist in the past for his warnings about the consequences of dumping carbon into the atmosphere. But in a new article, Wallace-Wells writes that the cost of solar and wind energy has fallen dramatically, and scientists now say the pace of global warming in coming decades will be slower than previously forecast. Wallace-Wells says we're still in for painful, long-lasting changes to the world we inhabit, and nations will have to decide how to adapt to the new climate reality.

TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new series Tulsa King starring Sylvester Stallone, and the new season of Yellowstone, starring Kevin Costner.

Our New Climate Reality

Our New Climate Reality

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New York Times science writer David Wallace-Wells brings us some new thinking on global warming — and it isn't all bad. He's been called an alarmist in the past for his warnings about the consequences of dumping carbon into the atmosphere. But in a new article, Wallace-Wells writes that the cost of solar and wind energy has fallen dramatically, and scientists now say the pace of global warming in coming decades will be slower than previously forecast. Wallace-Wells says we're still in for painful, long-lasting changes to the world we inhabit, and nations will have to decide how to adapt to the new climate reality.

TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new series Tulsa King starring Sylvester Stallone, and the new season of Yellowstone, starring Kevin Costner.