Nations are grappling with the issue of compensation for climate damage at COP27 : The Indicator from Planet Money As the COP27 climate conference begins, a tricky economic question is on the table: should wealthy nations compensate their lower-income neighbors who suffer most from the climate crisis? And how?

For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

COP-out: who's liable for climate change destruction?

COP-out: who's liable for climate change destruction?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1135217908/1135233540" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Mario Tama/Getty Images
Satellite data show sea level has risen about 6mm per year around Vanuatu since 1993, a rate nearly twice the global average, while temperatures have been increasing since 1950.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

National representatives from around the world are gathering at the COP27 conference in Egypt right now, and a complicated economic question is at the center of the discussion. Should wealthy nations with higher levels of carbon emissions compensate lower-income, less industrialized countries that are disproportionately bearing the cost of the climate crisis? And if so, how do you quantify the economic, environmental and cultural damage suffered by these countries into one neat sum?

Today, we bring you an episode of Short Wave. Our colleagues walk us through the political and economic consequences of this question, and what the negotiations going on at COPP27 might do to address it.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Newsletter.

Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, PocketCasts and NPR One.

For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.