After Midterms, Democrats And Republicans May Be Headed For A Divided Government : Consider This from NPR The "red wave" of Republican gains that some predicted didn't come to pass during the midterm elections. As of Wednesday afternoon, control of both houses of Congress was still up for grabs.

But it appears likely that the country is headed for a divided government. And if history is any guide, that could mean a lot of stalemates. Two political veterans explain what to expect: Ron Bonjean, a strategist with a long career of working for Republicans in both chambers of Congress, and Jim Messina, former Deputy Chief of Staff to President Obama.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

No Red Wave But A Divided Government Is Still A Possibility

No Red Wave But A Divided Government Is Still A Possibility

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The sun came up on the U.S. Capitol the day after voting ended in the midterm elections. Control of both houses of Congress was still up for grabs. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

The sun came up on the U.S. Capitol the day after voting ended in the midterm elections. Control of both houses of Congress was still up for grabs.

Samuel Corum/Getty Images

The "red wave" of Republican gains that some predicted didn't come to pass during the midterm elections. As of Wednesday afternoon, control of both houses of Congress was still up for grabs.

But it appears likely that the country is headed for a divided government. And if history is any guide, that could mean a lot of stalemates. Two political veterans explain what to expect: Ron Bonjean, a strategist with a long career of working for Republicans in both chambers of Congress, and Jim Messina, former Deputy Chief of Staff to President Obama.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Connor Donevan and Karen Zamora. It was edited by William Troop. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.