The dealership model gives car buyers less market power, but it could change : The Indicator from Planet Money Let's face it: buying a new car sucks. From the hidden dealership fees to the reams of paperwork, it just seems harder than it should be. Well, economically speaking, it is – and today, we explain why.

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Economists hate car dealerships too

Economists hate car dealerships too

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
A man inspects new Toyota cars on display at Melody Toyota in San Bruno, California.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

If you've ever bought a new car, you probably know how unpleasant the experience can be: sitting in a dealership for hours, nodding your head through mountains of paperwork and wondering, "why do they make this so hard? Couldn't I just do this online?"

TIME Economics Correspondent Alana Semuels, proud owner of a new Subaru Forester and recent veteran of the new-car-buying process, joins us today to talk car dealerships: why they exist, why some economists argue they shouldn't and whether or not they always will.

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