Rising Seas Turned A Would-be Farmer Into A Climate Migrant : Consider This from NPR Climate change is a present tense disaster in some parts of the world. In Senegal, rising seas are destroying neighborhoods and once-fertile farm fields.

That's pushing young Senegalese like Mamadou Niang to make the treacherous journey to Europe. He's attempted it three times: twice he was deported, the third time, he narrowly escaped drowning. But he says he's still determined to make it there.

We visit Senegal to see how climate migration is reshaping life there. And we meet a rapper named Matador, who is trying to help young people realize a future in Senegal, so they don't have to go to Europe.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

How Rising Seas Turned A Would-be Farmer Into A Climate Migrant

How Rising Seas Turned A Would-be Farmer Into A Climate Migrant

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Gandiol, Senegal (October 26, 2022) - Mamadou Niang's father worked the land until he died in 2006, and Mamadou would have liked to follow in his father's footsteps. But he can't, he says, because rising seas are pushing salt water into the fields. Ricci Shryock for NPR hide caption

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Ricci Shryock for NPR

Gandiol, Senegal (October 26, 2022) - Mamadou Niang's father worked the land until he died in 2006, and Mamadou would have liked to follow in his father's footsteps. But he can't, he says, because rising seas are pushing salt water into the fields.

Ricci Shryock for NPR

Climate change is a present tense disaster in some parts of the world. In Senegal, rising seas are destroying neighborhoods and once-fertile farm fields.

That's pushing young Senegalese like Mamadou Niang to make the treacherous journey to Europe. He's attempted it three times: twice he was deported, the third time, he narrowly escaped drowning. But he says he's still determined to make it there.

We visit Senegal to see how climate migration is reshaping life there. And we meet a rapper named Matador, who is trying to help young people realize a future in Senegal, so they don't have to go to Europe.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Connor Donevan, Noah Caldwell, Ayen Bior and Mallika Seshadri. It was edited by William Troop, Sarah Handel and Matt Ozug. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.