Election Denial and the Future of the GOP : 1A The majority of GOP candidates on the ballot this midterm have denied or challenged the results of the 2020 presidential election.

So far, election-denying candidates have performed slightly worse than expected. But this doesn't mean the threat of election denialism is gone.

We discuss what this midterm reveals about the future—or lack thereof—of election denialism.

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Election Denial and the Future of the GOP

Election Denial and the Future of the GOP

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Republican U.S. Senate candidate JD Vance speaks to supporters at an election watch party at the Renaissance Hotel in Columbus, Ohio. Andrew Spear/Andrew Spear/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Spear/Andrew Spear/Getty Images

Republican U.S. Senate candidate JD Vance speaks to supporters at an election watch party at the Renaissance Hotel in Columbus, Ohio.

Andrew Spear/Andrew Spear/Getty Images

The majority of GOP candidates on the ballot this midterm have denied or challenged the results of the 2020 presidential election. There were 291 in total. That's according to an analysis from The Washington Post.

So far, election-denying candidates have performed slightly worse than expected. But this doesn't mean the threat of election denialism is gone.

According to the same Post analysis, more than 143 election deniers won seats in the House as of Thursday. That's slightly more than the number of House Republicans who voted against counting electoral votes on Jan. 6.

We're still waiting on the results for races in two key states with election deniers on the ballot: Arizona and Nevada.

We discuss what this midterm reveals about the future—or lack thereof—of election denialism with David Becker, executive director and founder of the Center for Election Innovation and Research, Ned Foley, director of the Election Law Program at The Ohio State University's College of Law, Rina Shah, republican strategic consultant, and McKay Coppins, staff writer for The Atlantic.

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