Mushrooms, Slavery, and the Ballot Measures You May Have Missed : 1A We've heard a lot about candidates and parties, 132 measures were also on ballots across the U.S. last week.

From decriminalizing psychedelic mushrooms to prohibiting slavery, to implementing new rules around how and where we vote, Americans made a ton of local decisions with national implications this November.

We discuss some of the midterm results you might have missed and what they mean for American attitudes on important issues.

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Mushrooms, Slavery, and the Ballot Measures You May Have Missed

Mushrooms, Slavery, and the Ballot Measures You May Have Missed

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Ballots are processed by an election worker at the Clark County Election Department during the ongoing election process in North Las Vegas, Nevada. Mario Tama/Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Mario Tama/Getty Images

Ballots are processed by an election worker at the Clark County Election Department during the ongoing election process in North Las Vegas, Nevada.

Mario Tama/Mario Tama/Getty Images

Some states are still counting ballots cast in last week's midterm elections.

Key races are still on the line and the control of the House remains up for grabs. We've heard a lot about candidates and parties, 132 measures were also on ballots across the U.S. last week.

From decriminalizing psychedelic mushrooms to prohibiting slavery, to implementing new rules around how and where we vote, Americans made a ton of local decisions with national implications this November.

We go through some of the midterm results you might have missed and what they mean for American attitudes on important issues with Reid Wilson, Founder and Editor in Chief of Pluribus News; Beau Kilmer, director of the RAND Drug Policy Research Center; and Aaron Morrison, national race and ethnicity writer for the Associated Press.

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