Here's How Latinos Voted In The 2022 Midterms : 1A As the largest minority group in the United States, Latino voters have a huge say in how elections shake out.

While most Latino voters have traditionally leaned into the Democratic Party, both political parties have been largely unsuccessful in solidifying the voting bloc's support in the past four decades.

We convene a panel of experts to discuss what's driving the shift in Latino voting patterns, and what it might mean for future elections.

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Here's How Latinos Voted In The 2022 Midterms

Here's How Latinos Voted In The 2022 Midterms

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Hispanic voters go to the polls for early voting at the Miami-Dade Government Center in Miami, Florida. Gaston De Cardenas/Getty Images hide caption

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Gaston De Cardenas/Getty Images

Hispanic voters go to the polls for early voting at the Miami-Dade Government Center in Miami, Florida.

Gaston De Cardenas/Getty Images

This 2022 midterm election saw many Latino voters shift their support from the Democratic party to the Republican Party.

As the largest minority group in the country, Latino voters have a huge say in how elections shake out. Their turnout was key in clinching contentious races in Florida, Illinois, California, and Nevada – and helping Latino candidates make history.

Support for Democrats among Latino men is under 55 percent, that's down from 63 percent in 2018, according to a CNN exit poll. Among Latina women, support for the Democratic Party is strong, but waning.

This year, one fifth of Latino voters remained undecided in the days leading up to the election.

We gather a panel of experts to discuss what's driving the shift in Latino voting patterns, and what it might mean for future elections.

Our panel: Evelyn Pérez-Verdía, president of We Are Mas, Mike Madrid, co-founder of the Lincoln Project, former Republican congressman, Carlos Curbelo, and Congressman Vincente Gonzalez, who represents Texas' 15th District.

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