1A Remaking America: Redistricting And The Midterm Elections Every ten years, election maps are re-evaluated and redrawn to reflect states' populations. But how the maps are drawn differs from state to state.

So was the outcome of the midterms determined before voters even cast their ballots?

We gather a panel of experts to discuss how redistricting can advantage one party over another.

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1A Remaking America: Redistricting And The Midterm Elections

1A Remaking America: Redistricting And The Midterm Elections

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Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-NY), leader of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, departs following a news conference announcing his concession to opponent Mike Lawler at the DCCC in Washington, DC. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-NY), leader of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, departs following a news conference announcing his concession to opponent Mike Lawler at the DCCC in Washington, DC.

Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Results from last week's midterm elections are in. The GOP kept control of the House, and the Democrats maintained control of the Senate.

But how much of the outcome was determined before voters even cast their ballots?

Every ten years, election maps are re-evaluated and redrawn to reflect state populations. But how the maps are drawn differs from state to state.

Michigan's midterm map was drawn by a new nonpartisan group — the Independent Citizens Redistricting Commission.

In New York, maps were drawn by the Democratic-controlled state legislature, struck down, and then bounced around the court system. The state ultimately used maps drawn by a court-appointed special master.

Democratic Rep. Alexandra Ocasio Cortez says the redistricting chaos there is at least partly to blame for four Congressional seats flipping to the GOP.

We bring together a panel of experts to discuss how redistricting can advantage one party over another and how this played out in the 2022 midterm elections.

This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Fairvote's David Daley, University of Florida's Sharon Austin, The New York Times' Maya King, and The People's Katie Fahey join our panel.

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