COP27: Should Rich Nations Pay Up For The Effects Of Climate Change? : Consider This from NPR At COP 27, the annual U.N. conference on climate change, one of the big questions that's been raised is how some of the wealthier nations should be paying for the effects of climate change in less developed countries. The U.S. is one of those wealthier nations, and the Biden administration supports creating a fund to help developing countries deal with climate change. But year after year, the money isn't there. We speak with national climate adviser to President Biden, Ali Zaidi, to understand the role the U.S. has in addressing the global climate crisis. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

How Much Should Wealthier Nations Pay For The Effects Of Climate Change?

How Much Should Wealthier Nations Pay For The Effects Of Climate Change?

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Though wealthier countries are overwhelmingly responsible for climate change, poorer countries are bearing the brunt of the climate crisis, particularly in the Global South. A growing movement demands that rich countries pay for the damage inflicted on these vulnerable communities. SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

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SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

Though wealthier countries are overwhelmingly responsible for climate change, poorer countries are bearing the brunt of the climate crisis, particularly in the Global South. A growing movement demands that rich countries pay for the damage inflicted on these vulnerable communities.

SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

At COP 27, the annual U.N. conference on climate change, one of the big questions that's been raised is how some of the wealthier nations should be paying for the effects of climate change in less developed countries.

The U.S. is one of those wealthier nations, and the Biden administration supports creating a fund to help developing countries deal with climate change.

But year after year, the money isn't there.

We speak with national climate adviser to President Biden, Ali Zaidi, to understand the role the U.S. has in addressing the global climate crisis.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brianna Scott. It was edited by William Troop, Tara Neill and Neela Banerjee. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.