Meet The Everyday Crypto Investors Caught Up In The FTX Implosion : Consider This from NPR Jake Thacker of Portland, Ore. says he had $70,000 trapped in FTX when the the cryptocurrency exchange collapsed this month. That money may be gone.

And he's not the only one. The company's bankruptcy filing says it could owe money to more than a million people.

NPR's Chris Arnold reports on how the FTX implosion is affecting everyday investors.

And NPR's David Gura looks at whether it could spur Congress to pass new regulations on the crypto industry.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Meet The Everyday Crypto Investors Caught Up In The FTX Implosion

Meet The Everyday Crypto Investors Caught Up In The FTX Implosion

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FTX Arena, which the Miami Heat call home. Miami-Dade County and the Miami Heat are ending their arena naming rights deal with FTX after the company's collapse. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

FTX Arena, which the Miami Heat call home. Miami-Dade County and the Miami Heat are ending their arena naming rights deal with FTX after the company's collapse.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Jake Thacker of Portland, Ore. says he had $70,000 trapped in FTX when the the cryptocurrency exchange collapsed this month. That money may be gone.

And he's not the only one. The company's bankruptcy filing says it could owe money to more than a million people.

NPR's Chris Arnold reports on how the FTX implosion is affecting everyday investors.

And NPR's David Gura looks at whether it could spur Congress to pass new regulations on the crypto industry.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Connor Donevan, Enrique Rivera and David West. It was edited by William Troop, Uri Berliner and Lisa Lambert. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.