1A Remaking America: Is Our Democracy Truly Representative? Almost half of eligible voters cast a ballot in the most recent election, according to the U.S. Elections Project.

Still, voters can feel like our centuries-old voting system isn't working for us today.

1A spent election week in Wichita, Kansas, after voters decided to change how they elect their city school board.

This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

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1A Remaking America: Is Our Democracy Truly Representative?

1A Remaking America: Is Our Democracy Truly Representative?

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People vote as poll workers assist at a polling place at Galleria at Sunset in Henderson, Nevada. Mario Tama/Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Mario Tama/Getty Images

People vote as poll workers assist at a polling place at Galleria at Sunset in Henderson, Nevada.

Mario Tama/Mario Tama/Getty Images

Almost half of eligible voters cast a ballot in the most recent election, according to the U.S. Elections Project. That's not a bad turnout for midterm elections.

And candidates that cast doubt on our elections didn't do so well.

Still, voters can feel like our centuries-old voting system isn't working for us today.

Ranked choice voting is one option. Nevada voters opted for that system, joining other states like Maine and Alaska.

1A spent election week in Wichita, Kansas, after voters decided to change how they elect their city school board. Then, we discussed our Representative Democracy with Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of The National Constitution Center, and Peniel Joseph, professor of Public Affairs at the University of Texas-Austin.

This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Like what you hear? Find more of our programs online.