Life Is Hard For Migrants On Both Sides Of The Border Between African And Europe : Consider This from NPR There are two tiny patches of Spain on the African continent. One is a city called Melilla that's surrounded by Morocco and the Mediterranean Sea.

The European Union has spent billions to keep migrants from sub-Saharan Africa from crossing the border between Morocco and the Spanish city.

This episode, we look at what that means for the people who make it through and for the city they arrive in.

This story is part of an NPR series on climate migration and the far-right.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Life Is Hard For Migrants On Both Sides Of The Border Between Africa And Europe

Life Is Hard For Migrants On Both Sides Of The Border Between Africa And Europe

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Melilla, Spain (October 13, 2022) - A fence runs all around the land border that Melilla, Spain shares with Morocco. Ricci Shryock for NPR hide caption

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Ricci Shryock for NPR

Melilla, Spain (October 13, 2022) - A fence runs all around the land border that Melilla, Spain shares with Morocco.

Ricci Shryock for NPR

There are two tiny patches of Spain on the African continent. One is a city called Melilla that's surrounded by Morocco and the Mediterranean Sea.

The European Union has spent billions to keep migrants from sub-Saharan Africa from crossing the border between Morocco and the Spanish city.

This episode, we look at what that means for the people who make it through and for the city they arrive in.

This story is part of an NPR series on climate migration and the far-right.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Connor Donevan and Miguel Macias. It was edited by William Troop, Sarah Handel and Matt Ozug. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.