Newtown, 10 years After the Sandy Hook Tragedy : 1A It's been 10 years since the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, when 20 students and six educators were killed.

Davis Dunavin, who covered the Sandy Hook shooting in December 2012 as a young reporter, is behind a new podcast looking at the community a decade since the shooting.

"Still Newtown" leads with a question: How does a community come out the other side of tragedy?

We visit Newtown and those close to the story for answers.

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Newtown, 10 years After the Sandy Hook Tragedy

Newtown, 10 years After the Sandy Hook Tragedy

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The Sandy Hook Permanent memorial opened to the public on November 14, a month ahead of the anniversary of the tragedy. John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images

The Sandy Hook Permanent memorial opened to the public on November 14, a month ahead of the anniversary of the tragedy.

John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images

December 2022 marks 10 years since the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, when 20 students and six educators were killed.

Davis Dunavin, who covered the Sandy Hook shooting in December 2012 as a young reporter, is behind a new podcast looking at the community a decade since the shooting.

"Still Newtown" leads with a question: How does a community come out the other side of tragedy? We visit Newtown and those close to the story for answers.

We took a look at those questions with Davis Dunavin, host of Still Newtown and reporter at WSHU; Jennifer Hubbard, mother of Catherine Violet Hubbard, victim of the the Sandy Hook shooting and president of the Catherine Violet Hubbard Animal Sanctuary; Dan Katz, former news director at WSHU and vice president of news, Texas Public Radio.

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