Why Are Women's Health Concerns Dismissed So Often? : 1A From chronic pain to emergency room visits, women's medical concerns are often dismissed at higher rates than those of men.

One study shows that middle-aged women with chest pain were twice as likely to be diagnosed with a mental illness than their male counterparts. Another study found that women and people of color who visited emergency rooms with chest pain waited longer to be seen by a doctor.

America's gynecological practice has been traced back to slavery. Today, gender and racial bias still affect the way people are diagnosed and receive care.

We talk about why this still happens and what can be done about it.

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Why Are Women's Health Concerns Dismissed So Often?

Why Are Women's Health Concerns Dismissed So Often?

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Adam Berry/Getty Images

(Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images)

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From chronic pain to emergency room visits, women's medical concerns are often dismissed at higher rates than those of men.

One study shows that middle-aged women with chest pain were twice as likely to be diagnosed with a mental illness than their male counterparts. Another study found that women and people of color who visited emergency rooms with chest pain waited longer to be seen by a doctor.

America's gynecological practice has been traced back to slavery. Today, gender and racial bias still affect the way people are diagnosed and receive care.

Why does this still happen? What can be done about it?

Practicing OB/GYN and CEO of Power to Decide Dr. Raegan McDonald-Mosley, author of "The Pain Gap: How Sexism and Racism in Healthcare Kill Women" Anushay Hossain, and University of Nebraska-Lincoln professor and author of "Medical Bondage" Deirdre Cooper Owens join us for the conversation.

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