Competing economic forces have sustained a miners' strike for over 18 months : The Indicator from Planet Money The average labor strike lasts just over 40 days, but a union of coal miners in Alabama has been on strike for over a year and a half. Protesting for that long requires help, both from the community and the economy.

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The never-ending strike

The never-ending strike

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Stephan Bisaha/NPR
Antwon McGhee, a striking miner for Warrior Met Coal in Brookwood, Alabama, stands on the picket line.
Stephan Bisaha/NPR

The average strike lasts just over 40 days, according to Bloomberg Law. But some last much longer. In Brookwood, Alabama, coal miners have been on strike for over 600 days, and they don't have any intention of backing down anytime soon.

Today, Stephan Bisaha of the Gulf States Newsroom joins us to explain how global macroeconomic forces can converge to keep a labor strike going for so long, and what it takes to sustain it.

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For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.