Joe Biden's Gone to the U.S.-Mexico Border. What For? : 1A This week, President Biden made his first presidential trip to the U.S.-Mexico border, stopping in El Paso, Texas before heading to a summit in Mexico City.

He announced that his Administration will accept up to 30,000 migrants from Cuba, Haiti, Venezuela, and Nicaragua each month, and allow them to work in the U.S. for up to 2 years. They will also begin to send unauthorized migrants to Mexico.

So how far do the White House's latest immigration policies go? And what impact could they have on our fragile immigration system?

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Joe Biden's Gone to the U.S.-Mexico Border. What For?

Joe Biden's Gone to the U.S.-Mexico Border. What For?

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US President Joe Biden speaks with US Customs and Border Protection officers as he visits the US-Mexico border in El Paso, Texas, on January 8, 2023. (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images) JIM WATSON/JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JIM WATSON/JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

US President Joe Biden speaks with US Customs and Border Protection officers as he visits the US-Mexico border in El Paso, Texas, on January 8, 2023. (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)

JIM WATSON/JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

This week, President Biden made his first presidential trip to the U.S.-Mexico border, stopping in El Paso, Texas before heating to a summit in Mexico City.

His visit comes as migration to the U.S. is at a high. The Biden administration announced that it will accept up to 30,000 migrants from Cuba, Haiti, Venezuela, and Nicaragua each month and allow them to work in the U.S. for up to 2 years.

Additionally, as part of an agreement with the Mexican government under emergency health order Title 42, they will also begin to send unauthorized migrants to Mexico.

So how far do the White House's latest immigration policies go? And what impact could they have on our fragile immigration system?

We speak with Aaron Reichlin-Melnick, senior policy counsel at the American Immigration Council, and Elora Mukherjee, director of Columbia Law School's Immigrants' Rights Clinic.

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