How The Government Tracks Classified Documents—And Why It's An Imperfect System : Consider This from NPR The Justice Department is investigating the mishandling of classified documents linked to President Biden and to his predecessor, former President Trump. Both cases raise questions about how classified information should be handled.
NPR's Greg Myre explains how classified material is handled at the White House, and how that compares to other government agencies.
And we speak to Yale law professor and former special counsel at the Pentagon Oona Hathaway, about the issue of "overclassification" of documents.
In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.
Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

How The Government Tracks Classified Documents—And Why It's An Imperfect System

How The Government Tracks Classified Documents—And Why It's An Imperfect System

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By one estimate, some 50 million government documents are classified every year. Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

By one estimate, some 50 million government documents are classified every year.

Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

The Justice Department is investigating the mishandling of classified documents linked to President Biden and to his predecessor, former President Trump. Both cases raise questions about how classified information should be handled.

NPR's Greg Myre explains how classified material is handled at the White House, and how that compares to other government agencies.

And we speak to Yale law professor and former special counsel at the Pentagon Oona Hathaway, about the issue of "overclassification" of documents.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Michael Levitt and Kai McNamee. It was edited by Ashley Brown and William Troop. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.