What is the platinum coin and could it fix the debt ceiling crisis? : The Indicator from Planet Money Forget extraordinary measures. Today we're going full extra extraordinary. How a trillion-dollar platinum coin could get the country around the debt ceiling limit.

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What's the deal with the platinum coin?

What's the deal with the platinum coin?

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The jig is up. The U.S. can't legally borrow any more money. Maybe you've heard of "extraordinary measures" being taken to make sure the government can keep paying its bills. Today on the show, an extra extraordinary measure—a single, trillion-dollar platinum coin to fund the government's spending.

We hear from Willamette University assistant law professor Rohan Grey about how this would work, and from Louise Sheiner of the Brookings Institution about why it probably won't happen.

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Correction Jan. 27, 2023

A previous version of this episode page misspelled Rohan Grey's last name as Gray.