Does Conservative Mean Whatever Donald Trump Says It Means? : The NPR Politics Podcast After extracting a slew of concessions from Kevin McCarthy during the Speaker vote saga, conservative House Republicans are now flexing their muscles in a fight over the U.S. debt. But what does the "conservative" label mean right now? New research suggests that many politically-active voters use it to mean most similar to Donald Trump.

This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional reporter Barbara Sprunt, congressional correspondent Claudia Grisales, and political correspondent Danielle Kurtzleben.

This episode was produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. It was edited by Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Research and fact-checking by Devin Speak.

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Does Conservative Mean Whatever Donald Trump Says It Means?

Does Conservative Mean Whatever Donald Trump Says It Means?

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Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) (L) shakes hands with former U.S. President Donald Trump (R) during a rally at the Banks County Dragway on March 26, 2022 in Commerce, Georgia. Megan Varner/Getty Images hide caption

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Megan Varner/Getty Images

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) (L) shakes hands with former U.S. President Donald Trump (R) during a rally at the Banks County Dragway on March 26, 2022 in Commerce, Georgia.

Megan Varner/Getty Images

After extracting a slew of concessions from Kevin McCarthy during the Speaker vote saga, conservative House Republicans are now flexing their muscles in a fight over the U.S. debt. But what does the "conservative" label mean right now? New research suggests that many politically-active voters use it to mean most similar to Donald Trump.

This episode was produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. It was edited by Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Research and fact-checking by Devin Speak.

Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at
plus.npr.org.

Connect:
Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org
Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.
Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.