Ron DeSantis And The Battle Over Black History : 1A This week, the College Board released the updated framework for its advanced African American Studies course amid backlash from conservative lawmakers over the curriculum.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and the Florida Department of Education banned the course from being taught in the state's public schools.

In a statement, the FDOE called the course a violation of state law and lacking in historical value, a claim that many experts and historians refute.

Critics say it's a further attempt by conservative politicians to limit what and how history – particularly racial history – is taught.

We discuss the role of politics in determining school curriculum.

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Ron DeSantis And The Battle Over Black History

Ron DeSantis And The Battle Over Black History

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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis gives a victory speech after defeating Democratic gubernatorial candidate Rep. Charlie Crist. Octavio Jones/Getty Images hide caption

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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis gives a victory speech after defeating Democratic gubernatorial candidate Rep. Charlie Crist.

Octavio Jones/Getty Images

This week, the College Board released the updated framework for its advanced African American Studies course amid backlash from conservative lawmakers over the curriculum.

Last month, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and the Florida Department of Education banned the course from being taught in the state's public schools.

In a statement, the FDOE called the course a violation of state law and lacking in historical value, a claim that many experts and historians refute.

Critics say it's a further attempt by conservative politicians to limit what and how history – particularly racial history – is taught.

What place should politics have in determining school curriculum? How should states regulate the teaching of history?

We're joined by; President of the Florida Education Association Andrew Spar, Democratic member of the Florida Senate, Shevrin Jones, and President of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund Janai Nelson. Also with us for the conversation is education historian and professor of education at Binghamton University, Adam Laats, and professor of history at The New School, Natalia Mehlman Petrzela.

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