House Freshmen Weigh In On A Divided Congress : Consider This from NPR President Joe Biden's State of the Union address seemed like business as usual, until one of Biden's remarks drew loud boos from some Republican lawmakers.
We ask two House freshmen – Democrat Maxwell Frost of Florida and Republican Mike Lawler of New York – what they made of that moment and how they think the two parties could work together in a narrowly divided Congress.
In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.
Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

The State Of The Union And A House Narrowly Divided

The State Of The Union And A House Narrowly Divided

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President Joe Biden delivers his State of the Union address to the new Republican-controlled House. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Joe Biden delivers his State of the Union address to the new Republican-controlled House.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Joe Biden's State of the Union address seemed like business as usual, until one of Biden's remarks drew loud boos from some Republican lawmakers.

We ask two House freshmen – Democrat Maxwell Frost of Florida and Republican Mike Lawler of New York – what they made of that moment and how they think the two parties could work together in a narrowly divided Congress.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Michael Levitt and Lee Hale. It was edited by William Troop, Courtney Dorning and Christopher Intagliata. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.