Whose Nightmares Are We Telling? How Horror Has Evolved for People of Color : Code Switch Host B.A. Parker talks to Jasmin Savoy Brown, of the recently-released Scream 6, about playing a queer Black girl who lives. And film critics Richard Newby and Mallory Yu discuss how horror movies can actually help us empathize with each other

Whose Nightmares Are We Telling? How Horror Has Evolved for People of Color

Whose Nightmares Are We Telling? How Horror Has Evolved for People of Color

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Jasmin Savoy Brown stars in Scream 6 and Yellowjackets. photo by Robb Klassen/design by NPR hide caption

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photo by Robb Klassen/design by NPR

Jasmin Savoy Brown stars in Scream 6 and Yellowjackets.

photo by Robb Klassen/design by NPR

Whether you love jump scares or find yourself plugging your ears and clutching pillows, horror is a powerful place for social commentary. And while it hasn't always been a safe space for POCs, times are changing.

On this episode, film critics Mallory Yu and Richard Newby talk about how horror as a genre has evolved, whose nightmares we're telling, and how scary movies can actually help us empathize with each other.

Then, host B.A. Parker talks to Jasmin Savoy Brown of the recently-released Scream 6 about playing a queer Black girl who lives.

Production and booking help from Kumari Devarajan, Alyssa Jeong Perry and Olivia Chilkoti