How Child Labor Violations Have Quadrupled Since 2015 : 1A Children are working some of the most dangerous jobs in the U.S. according to a new investigation by The New York Times.

Child labor violations have nearly quadrupled since 2015, according to data from the Labor Department. This includes some migrant children who are working throughout the manufacturing industry. Interviews with 60 caseworkers found that two-thirds of unaccompanied migrant children end up working full-time.

Even with those statistics, some states are still looking to loosen child labor restrictions to meet hiring needs.

We discuss how we got here and what needs to be done to address child labor violations.

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How Child Labor Violations Have Quadrupled Since 2015

How Child Labor Violations Have Quadrupled Since 2015

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An investigation by the New York Times found that two-thirds of unaccompanied migrant children end up working full time. JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP via Getty Images

An investigation by the New York Times found that two-thirds of unaccompanied migrant children end up working full time.

JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP via Getty Images

Children are working some of the most dangerous jobs in the U.S. according to a new investigation by The New York Times.

Migrant children are working throughout the manufacturing industry. Interviews with 60 caseworkers found that two-thirds of unaccompanied migrant children end up working full-time.

Meanwhile, some states are looking to loosen child labor restrictions to meet hiring needs. A bill in Iowa would allow children as young as 14 to work in freezers and meat coolers and to unload tools in certain conditions.

Child labor violations have nearly quadrupled since 2015, according to data from the Labor Department. So how did we get here? And what needs to be done to address child labor violations?

Joining us for the conversation is Investigative Reporter at The New York Times' Hannah Dreier and Director of Child Labor Advocacy at the National Consumers League Reid Maki.

Also with us is Director of the Project on State and Local Enforcement at Harvard Law School's Labor and Worklife Program Terri Gerstein, Solicitor of Labor at the Department of Labor Seema Nanda, and Assistant Secretary at the Administration of Children and Families January Contreras.

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