Everyone Everywhere All At Once : Throughline This year's Oscars were one of the most diverse in history, in all kinds of ways. Everything Everywhere All At Once swept some of the biggest categories, notching incredible victories for Asian and Asian American actors, directors, and writers. At the same time, huge gaps persist – to take just one example, only seven women have ever been nominated for Best Director, and only three have won.

What does it mean to be seen? Can you measure it in numbers? Does representation matter? And if so, how much?

In this episode, we take a trip through film history to explore how these questions have played out over the last century, and where we might have yet to go — starting when the American film industry was incredibly diverse, and the most successful director in Hollywood was a woman.

Everyone Everywhere All At Once

Everyone Everywhere All At Once

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imaginima/Getty Images
Front side of a wooden / white director&#039;s chair under the spot light.
imaginima/Getty Images

This year's Oscars were one of the most diverse in history, in all kinds of ways. Everything Everywhere All At Once swept some of the biggest categories, notching incredible victories for Asian and Asian American actors, directors, and writers. At the same time, huge gaps persist – to take just one example, only seven women have ever been nominated for Best Director, and only three have won.

What does it mean to be seen? Can you measure it in numbers? Does representation matter? And if so, how much?

In this episode, we take a trip through film history to explore how these questions have played out over the last century, and where we might have yet to go — starting when the American film industry was incredibly diverse, and the most successful director in Hollywood was a woman.