Reactions to Trump indictment People from across the country reacted differently to the historic indictment of former President Donald Trump.

Reactions to Trump indictment

Reactions to Trump indictment

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People from across the country reacted differently to the historic indictment of former President Donald Trump.

SCOTT DETROW, HOST:

Next week, for the first time in American history, a former president is scheduled to appear in court to face criminal charges. Donald Trump will hear the details of the charges the Manhattan district attorney has filed against him. He's expected to be fingerprinted and pose for a mug shot, too. All of this is new territory. America's reactions to it, though? Well, that feels pretty familiar.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: Wow. There is justice. It really does exist.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: I think it's just nonsense. I really do. They - because he's Republican, and the media hates Republicans. A lot of the country hates Republicans. And it would be nice if they would show the same fairness to Democrats when they do something wrong.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #3: He's constantly playing with fire and thinks he can get away with it. He pays people off. He threatens people. He bullies people. He lies to people. He lies to more. He hires lawyers to lie, and he gets away with it. And not this time.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #4: The law should be applied fairly. And if he's innocent, he'll get his day in court.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #5: Nobody is above the law in the end. So if he did the wrong deeds, he should face the law and pay the price.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #6: I couldn't believe that such a travesty of justice was occurring in America. I mean, it's ridiculous.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #7: I guess my concern is how much it divides the country, rightfully or wrongfully.

DETROW: Those voices from New Jersey, Florida, and here in Washington, D.C., show how Donald Trump still animates his large base of supporters and still angers millions of others.

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