VR motion sickness, 10,000 step goals, benefits of ice baths : Short Wave Another week comes by, and luckily so does our roundup of science news. This time, we've got some questions about better understanding our health: Why do some people get motion sickness from virtual reality (VR) content? Do we really need to walk 10,000 steps a day? And is there real science behind ice baths?

This week, Sacha Pfeiffer, legendary reporter and occasional host of NPR's All Things Considered, who joins our hosts Emily Kwong and Regina G. Barber to demystify and (in some cases) debunk the science of this week's health headlines.

We love hearing what you're reading and what science catches your eye! Reach the show by emailing shortwave@npr.org.

Some people get sick from VR. Why?

Some people get sick from VR. Why?

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Andriy Onufriyenko/Getty Images
Portrait of young man wearing VR glasses in studio on purple background.
Andriy Onufriyenko/Getty Images

Another week comes by, and luckily so does our roundup of science news. This time, we've got some questions about better understanding our health: Why do only some people get motion sickness from virtual reality (VR) content? Do we really need to walk 10,000 steps a day? And is there real science behind ice baths?

This week, Sacha Pfeiffer, legendary reporter and occasional host of NPR's All Things Considered, who joins our hosts Emily Kwong and Regina G. Barber to demystify and (in some cases) debunk the science of this week's health headlines.

We love hearing what you're reading and what science catches your eye! Reach the show by emailing shortwave@npr.org.

Listen to Short Wave on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts.

This episode was produced by Liz Metzger with Kai McNamee. It was edited by Brent Baughman, Christopher Intagliata and managing producer Rebecca Ramirez.