The implications of the case against ICWA : Code Switch The Supreme Court is about to decide on a case arguing that the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) discriminates against white foster parents. Journalist Rebecca Nagle explains how this decision could reverse centuries of U.S. law protecting the rights of Indigenous nations. "Native kids have been the tip of the spear in attacks on tribal sovereignty for generations."

The implications of the case against ICWA

The implications of the case against ICWA

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Rebecca Nagle is the host of the podcast "This Land." Sean Scheidt/Sean Scheidt hide caption

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Sean Scheidt/Sean Scheidt

Rebecca Nagle is the host of the podcast "This Land."

Sean Scheidt/Sean Scheidt

The Supreme Court is about to decide on a case arguing that the Indian Child Welfare Act, or ICWA, discriminates against white people. The lawsuit seeks to reframe tribal membership as a racial rather than a political category, and argues that it disadvantages white foster parents trying to adopt Native children.

This week, Rebecca Nagle, host of the This Land podcast, explains how this decision could reverse centuries of U.S. law and precedent protecting the rights of Indigenous nations.

"It's sinister...but when you understand history, using the children of Native nations to attack tribal sovereignty is sadly something the U.S. has been doing for generations."

Brian Jarboe engineered this episode.