Iran's Nuclear Program Marches Forward, 5 Years After The U.S. Abandoned The Deal : Consider This from NPR It's been five years since the U.S. pulled out of the nuclear deal. What followed: the U-S re-imposed crushing sanctions, over time, Iran stopped adhering to the limits the deal had set and day-by-day its nuclear program crept forward.

So how close is Iran to a bomb? What can the U.S. do to stop Iran, if it chooses to pursue one? And how are regional and global shifts changing the equation?

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly puts these questions to the U.S. special envoy for Iran, Rob Malley, and to Vali Nasr with the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Iran's Nuclear Program Marches Forward, 5 Years After The U.S. Abandoned The Deal

Iran's Nuclear Program Marches Forward, 5 Years After The U.S. Abandoned The Deal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1178934701/1200108553" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Iranian Foreign Minister Hossein Amir-Abdollahian (L) meets with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) chief Rafael Grossi in Tehran on March 4. The UN nuclear watchdog chief was in Iran for expected talks with the President and other officials after the discovery of uranium particles enriched to near weapons-grade level. Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images

Iranian Foreign Minister Hossein Amir-Abdollahian (L) meets with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) chief Rafael Grossi in Tehran on March 4. The UN nuclear watchdog chief was in Iran for expected talks with the President and other officials after the discovery of uranium particles enriched to near weapons-grade level.

Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images

It's been five years since the U.S. pulled out of the nuclear deal. What followed: the U-S re-imposed crushing sanctions, over time, Iran stopped adhering to the limits the deal had set and day-by-day its nuclear program crept forward.

So how close is Iran to a bomb? What can the U.S. do to stop Iran, if it chooses to pursue one? And how are regional and global shifts changing the equation?

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly puts these questions to the U.S. special envoy for Iran, Rob Malley, and to Vali Nasr with the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Connor Donevan with audio engineering by Ted Mebane. It was edited by Courtney Dorning. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.