Missing White Woman Syndrome: The Media Bias Against Missing People of Color : Consider This from NPR Every year about 600,000 thousand people are reported missing in the United States per the National Missing and Unidentified Persons database.

In 2022, about 34,000 people reported as actively missing were people of color. But people of color who disappear seldom get the same amount of media attention devoted to white people who go missing - especially white women and children.

The late journalist Gwen Ifill coined the phrase "Missing White Woman Syndrome" to describe the media's fascination with, and detailed coverage of, the cases of missing or endangered white women - compared to the seeming disinterest in covering the disappearances of people of color.

NPR's Juana Summers speaks with David Robinson II. His son, Daniel Robinson, has been missing for nearly two years. And Natalie Wilson, co-founder of the Black and Missing Foundation, who has been helping him find answers.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Missing White Woman Syndrome: The Media Bias Against Missing People of Color

Missing White Woman Syndrome: The Media Bias Against Missing People of Color

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In 2022, about 34,000 people reported as actively missing were people of color. Getty Images hide caption

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In 2022, about 34,000 people reported as actively missing were people of color.

Getty Images

Every year about 600,000 thousand people are reported missing in the United States per the National Missing and Unidentified Persons database.

In 2022, about 34,000 people reported as actively missing were people of color. But people of color who disappear seldom get the same amount of media attention devoted to white people who go missing - especially white women and children.

The late journalist Gwen Ifill coined the phrase "Missing White Woman Syndrome" to describe the media's fascination with, and detailed coverage of, the cases of missing or endangered white women - compared to the seeming disinterest in covering the disappearances of people of color.

NPR's Juana Summers speaks with David Robinson II. His son, Daniel Robinson, has been missing for nearly two years. And Natalie Wilson, co-founder of the Black and Missing Foundation, who has been helping him find answers.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brianna Scott with help from Jonathan Franklin. It was edited by Jeanette Woods. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.