Wildfire smoke is blanketing much of the U.S. Here's how to protect yourself : Short Wave Smoke from Canadian wildfires is causing poor air quality in parts of the U.S. This smoke can have dangerous health effects because it carries fine particulates known as PM 2.5. With millions of people affected, we thought it would be a good time to turn it over to our friends at NPR's Life Kit podcast. Ever ready with helpful tips, they just released an episode with tips for protecting yourself from wildfire smoke.

Stay safe, Short Wavers.

Wildfire smoke is blanketing much of the U.S. Here's how to protect yourself

Wildfire smoke is blanketing much of the U.S. Here's how to protect yourself

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New York topped the list of most polluted major cities in the world on Tuesday night, as smoke from the wildfires in Canada continues to blanket the East Coast of the United States. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images hide caption

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David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

New York topped the list of most polluted major cities in the world on Tuesday night, as smoke from the wildfires in Canada continues to blanket the East Coast of the United States.

David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Right now, hundreds of wildfires are burning in Canada. Wind has blown the smoke over cities, from Ottawa to New York City and beyond.

If you can see the haze outside your window, the sky is an unusual color or the air smells like campfire, it's best to stay indoors, if possible.

Wildfire smoke contains fine particulates, also known as PM2.5. These tiny, lightweight particles travel far and can go deep into your lungs and bloodstream, causing inflammation, heart attacks, strokes, asthma and other breathing issues.

Today on Short Wave, we bring you an episode of Life Kit, NPR's how-to podcast. Host Marielle Segarra and NPR producer Liz Baker share tips on how to protect yourself from wildfire smoke.

The audio portion of this episode was produced by Sylvie Douglis and edited by Meghan Keane.