He defected from North Korean in 2014. Now he offers a glimpse into the country. : Consider This from NPR When Kim Hyun-woo stepped into the NPR studios in Washington, he was doing something that in his past life would have gotten him killed - speaking frankly with an American journalist.

That's because Mr. Kim spent 17 years working for North Korean intelligence at the Ministry of State Security.

He defected in 2014 and lives today in South Korea.

In a rare glimpse behind the curtain of one of the most isolated countries in the world, he shared his thoughts on pathways to diplomacy between Washington and Pyongyang, possible successors to Kim Jong Un and his fears for loved ones who remain in North Korea.

Kim Hyun-woo spoke with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly in an exclusive interview.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

A North Korean Defector's Thoughts On Diplomacy With U.S.

A North Korean Defector's Thoughts On Diplomacy With U.S.

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A North Korean soldier looks across the Yalu river near Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong in April 2017. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

A North Korean soldier looks across the Yalu river near Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong in April 2017.

Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

When Kim Hyun-woo stepped into the NPR studios in Washington, he was doing something that in his past life would have gotten him killed - speaking frankly with an American journalist.

That's because Mr. Kim spent 17 years working for North Korean intelligence at the Ministry of State Security.

He defected in 2014 and lives today in South Korea.

He offered a rare glimpse behind the curtain of one of the most isolated countries in the world.

He spoke with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly in an exclusive interview.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Karen Zamora and Gus Contreras. It was edited by Jeanette Woods and Sarah Handel. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.