Manhattan Project scientists made atomic bombs dropped on Japan : Short Wave Christopher Nolan's new film 'Oppenheimer' chronicles the life and legacy of J. Robert Oppenheimer, the first director of Los Alamos National Laboratory and so-called "Father of the Atomic Bomb." The movie does not shy away from science — and neither do we. We talked to current scientists at Los Alamos about the past and present science of nuclear weapons like the atomic bomb.

Read more about the Manhattan Project.

Want us to cover other historical science or science in pop culture? Email us at shortwave@npr.org — we'd love to hear from you!

'Oppenheimer' is everywhere. Here's the science behind the atomic bomb

'Oppenheimer' is everywhere. Here's the science behind the atomic bomb

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1189012807/1200392668" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

On July 16, 1945, scientists detonated "Gadget," the world's first atomic bomb. White Sands Missile Range Photo hide caption

toggle caption
White Sands Missile Range Photo

On July 16, 1945, scientists detonated "Gadget," the world's first atomic bomb.

White Sands Missile Range Photo

Christopher Nolan's new film 'Oppenheimer' chronicles the life and legacy of J. Robert Oppenheimer, the first director of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the so-called "Father of the Atomic Bomb." The movie does not shy away from science — and neither do we. We talked to current scientists at Los Alamos about the past and present science of nuclear weapons like the atomic bomb.

Read more about the Manhattan Project.

Want us to cover other historical science or science in pop culture? Email us at shortwave@npr.org — we'd love to hear from you!