Conspiracy Theories Are Having A Moment — It's Bad For Democracy : The NPR Politics Podcast Democratic presidential hopeful Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.'s embrace of conspiracy theories and famous last name have made him a guest in the contrarian podcast space. His bid has been boosted by the likes of Elon Musk and Steve Bannon.

And the lead actor of a breakout Christian thriller — based on the dubious claims of an anti-sex trafficking organization — has spread a number of conspiracy theories as he's promoted the movie, which has been embraced and promoted by a host of establishment conservatives.

Why are malignant conspiracies finding such purchase in the American public — and what does it say about the health of our democracy?

This episode: political correspondent Susan Davis, senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving, and disinformation correspondent Shanon Bond.

The podcast is produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. Our editor is Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi.

Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at
plus.npr.org.

Connect:
Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org
Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.
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Conspiracy Theories Are Having A Moment — It's Bad For Democracy

Conspiracy Theories Are Having A Moment — It's Bad For Democracy

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Democratic presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy Jr. speaks during a hearing with the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Weaponization of the Federal Government on Capitol Hill on July 20, 2023 in Washington, DC. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Democratic presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy Jr. speaks during a hearing with the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Weaponization of the Federal Government on Capitol Hill on July 20, 2023 in Washington, DC.

Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Democratic presidential hopeful Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.'s embrace of conspiracy theories and famous last name have made him a guest in the contrarian podcast space. His bid has been boosted by the likes of Elon Musk and Steve Bannon.

And the lead actor of a breakout Christian thriller — based on the dubious claims of an anti-sex trafficking organization — has spread a number of conspiracy theories as he's promoted the movie, which has been embraced and promoted by a host of establishment conservatives.

Why are malignant conspiracies finding such purchase in the American public — and what does it say about the health of our democracy?

The podcast is produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. Our editor is Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi.

Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at
plus.npr.org.

Connect:
Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org
Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.
Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.