Microsoft, Activision Blizzard, And The Future Of Gaming : 1A Microsoft's intention to purchase video game developer Activision Blizzard was first announced in January 2022.

The Federal Trade Commission issued a complaint against the deal, saying it would harm competition in the gaming market. That case went to trial — and Microsoft came out on top,

And the deal still faces roadblocks in the United Kingdom, where the Competition and Markets Authority initially blocked the deal and is now holding a hearing to review it next month.

But despite those roadblocks, the deal is set to close. And it may change the business of video games for the foreseeable future.

We discuss the buyout and how this acquisition could affect the future of gaming.

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Microsoft, Activision Blizzard, And The Future Of Gaming

Microsoft, Activision Blizzard, And The Future Of Gaming

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This photo shows the logo for US gaming giant Blizzard Entertainment during the annual China Digital Entertainment Expo and Conference, known as ChinaJoy, in Shanghai. -/CNS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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-/CNS/AFP via Getty Images

This photo shows the logo for US gaming giant Blizzard Entertainment during the annual China Digital Entertainment Expo and Conference, known as ChinaJoy, in Shanghai.

-/CNS/AFP via Getty Images

The biggest tech acquisition ever is set to close any day now.

Microsoft's intention to purchase video game developer Activision Blizzard was first announced in January 2022.

The Federal Trade Commission issued a complaint against the deal, saying it would harm competition in the gaming market. They also questioned the accessibility of Activision's biggest franchise, "Call of Duty."

That case went to trial — and Microsoft came out on top, proving that the acquisition wouldn't be anti-competitive and agreeing to make sure "Call of Duty" wouldn't be exclusive to its console, Xbox.

The deal still faces roadblocks in the United Kingdom, where the Competition and Markets Authority initially blocked the deal and is now holding a hearing to review it next month.

But despite those roadblocks, the deal is set to close. And it may change the business of video games for the foreseeable future. We convene a panel of experts to talk about the buyout.

Joining 1A Guest Host David Gura for the conversation is Gene Park, video games reporter at The Washington Post, and Rebekah Valentine, a senior writer at IGN. Also joining the conversation is Douglas Melamed, professor at Stanford Law School.

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