Hyundai and Kia recall 92,000 cars, urge owners to park outside due to fire risk Several Hyundai and Kia models are being recalled over faulty oil pumps that can overheat and cause fires — less than five months since the two automakers recalled vehicles due to another fire hazard.

Hyundai and Kia recall nearly 92,000 cars and urge outdoor parking due to fire risk

Over 52,000 Hyundai vehicles and 39,000 Kia cars in the U.S. are expected to be affected in the recalls. The logo of the Hyundai Motor Co. is displayed at the automaker's showroom in Seoul, South Korea, on April 26, 2017. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

Over 52,000 Hyundai vehicles and 39,000 Kia cars in the U.S. are expected to be affected in the recalls. The logo of the Hyundai Motor Co. is displayed at the automaker's showroom in Seoul, South Korea, on April 26, 2017.

Lee Jin-man/AP

Hyundai and Kia are recalling nearly 92,000 cars in the U.S. over concerns that the electronic controller in the oil pumps can overheat and cause fires. Both automakers have asked owners to park their vehicles outside and "away from structures" until repairs can be made.

Hyundai's recall includes the 2023 Tucson, Sonata, Elantra and Kona vehicles, as well as 2023 and 2024 Palisade cars. Kia's recall covers 2023 Soul and Sportage vehicles, as well as 2023 and 2024 Seltos models.

Kia reported six incidents of melting components, none of which resulted in fires or injuries. Meanwhile, Hyundai has learned of four incidents that also did not lead to any injuries.

Affected Hyundai owners will be notified by letter beginning Sept. 25, while Kia will notify impacted owners starting Sept. 28. Those with a damaged oil pump will be able to have it replaced free-of-charge at their local dealer, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Kia said owners may know their car was affected if any of its various warning lamps light up, the vehicle goes into "limp home mode," the engine does not turn off, smoke comes from the engine compartment, or the vehicle is inoperative.

According to Hyundai, owners may continue driving potentially affected cars, but the company recommends parking their vehicles outside and away from structures. Kia similarly asked owners to keep their cars outdoors.

Both recalls were related to damaged electrical components found in the Idle Stop & Go oil pump, known for saving fuel by automatically shutting down the engine when the vehicle is at a standstill.

The recalls come less than five months since the last time the two companies recalled a combined 571,000 vehicles due to faulty tow hitch harnesses that also posed a fire hazard.