100,000 Afghans Were Airlifted Out Of Kabul. What Happened To Those Who Weren't? : Consider This from NPR It's been two years since the Taliban entered Kabul, throwing the final days of the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan into chaos. Crowds of people desperate to leave the country surrounded the airport.

Tens of thousands of Afghans were airlifted out before American troops pulled out. Many more are still trying to reach the U.S. Some are risking their lives to cross the border from Mexico.

NPR's Tom Bowman has the story of one family who traveled from Afghanistan to Virginia, by way of Pakistan and Mexico, to get medical care for their young daughter.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

100,000 Afghans Were Airlifted Out Of Kabul. What Happened To Those Who Weren't?

100,000 Afghans Were Airlifted Out Of Kabul. What Happened To Those Who Weren't?

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Shafiullah Amani with one of his his two daughters in Alexandria, VA on August 3, 2023. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Shafiullah Amani with one of his his two daughters in Alexandria, VA on August 3, 2023.

Catie Dull/NPR

It's been two years since the Taliban entered Kabul, throwing the final days of the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan into chaos. Crowds of people desperate to leave the country surrounded the airport.

Tens of thousands of Afghans were airlifted out before American troops pulled out. Many more are still trying to reach the U.S. Some are risking their lives to cross the border from Mexico.

NPR's Tom Bowman has the story of one family who traveled from Afghanistan to Virginia, by way of Pakistan and Mexico, to get medical care for their young daughter.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Walter Ray Watson and Connor Donevan. It was edited by Andrew Sussman and William Troop. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.