To Be Greener, Get Rid Of Your Grass : Consider This from NPR Who doesn't love a lush, perfectly manicured grass lawn? It turns out, a lot of people are actively trying to get rid of their lawns, ripping out grass in favor of native plants, vegetables, and flowers to attract pollinators.

As the realities of climate change become starker, more and more people are looking for ways to create environmentally friendly spaces.

NPR's Scott Detrow talks with research ecologist Susannah Lerman with the United States Forest Service about the impact of grass lawns on the environment and sustainable alternatives.

To Be Greener, Get Rid Of Your Grass

To Be Greener, Get Rid Of Your Grass

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A regenerative front yard garden that has replaced a typical grass lawn is seen in Los Angeles July 21, 2022. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

A regenerative front yard garden that has replaced a typical grass lawn is seen in Los Angeles July 21, 2022.

Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Who doesn't love a lush, perfectly manicured grass lawn? It turns out, a lot of people are actively trying to get rid of their lawns, ripping out grass in favor of native plants, vegetables, and flowers to attract pollinators.

As the realities of climate change become starker, more and more people are looking for ways to create environmentally friendly spaces.

NPR's Scott Detrow talks with research ecologist Susannah Lerman with the United States Forest Service about the impact of grass lawns on the environment and sustainable alternatives.