The complex questions that arise when algorithms and AI intersect with race : Code Switch OK, not exactly a computer — more like, the wild array of technologies that inform what we consume on our computers and phones. Because on this episode, we're looking at how AI and race bias intersect. Safiya Noble, a professor at UCLA and the author of the book Algorithms of Oppression talks us through some of the messy issues that arise when algorithms and tech are used as substitutes for good old-fashioned human brains.

How does a computer discriminate?

How does a computer discriminate?

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Safiya Noble, a professor of Africana studies, gender, and the internet at UCLA, as well as the author of the book Algorithms of Oppression. Headshot by John Davis hide caption

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Headshot by John Davis

Safiya Noble, a professor of Africana studies, gender, and the internet at UCLA, as well as the author of the book Algorithms of Oppression.

Headshot by John Davis

OK, not exactly a computer — more like, the wild array of technologies that inform what we consume on our computers and phones. Because on this episode, we're looking at how AI and race bias intersect. Safiya Noble, a professor at UCLA and the author of the book Algorithms of Oppression talks us through some of the messy issues that arise when algorithms and tech are used as substitutes for good old-fashioned human brains. And she says when it comes to understanding Artificial Intelligence, we should emphasize the "A" — and take the "I" with a grain of salt.