A.D.A. Now! (2020) : Throughline The Americans with Disabilities Act is considered the most important civil rights law since the 1960s. Through first-person stories, we look back at the making of this movement, the history of how disability came to be seen as a civil rights issue in the first place, and what the disability community is still fighting for more than 30 years later.

A.D.A. Now! (2020)

A.D.A. Now! (2020)

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The Tom Olin Collection
A group of people with disabilities crawl up the steps of the U.S. Capitol to draw support for the Americans with Disabilities Act, March 12th, 1990.
The Tom Olin Collection

The Americans with Disabilities Act is considered the most important civil rights law since the 1960s. Through first-person stories, we look back at the making of this movement, the history of how disability came to be seen as a civil rights issue in the first place, and what the disability community is still fighting for more than 30 years later.


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