Wild African honeyguide bird guides you to honey on call : Short Wave Honeyguides are wild birds that team up with humans and then lead them to honey. Researchers recently found that the calls these birds respond to are unique and tied to their location. NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce talks about this relationship and shares how researchers followed honeyguides to learn about their call behaviors.

Read Nell's full story here.

Hear about an amazing wildlife phenomenon? Email us at shortwave@npr.org.

This wild African bird comes when it's called—and then leads you to honey

This wild African bird comes when it's called—and then leads you to honey

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A male Greater Honeyguide in Mozambique's Niassa Special Reserve. Claire Spottiswoode hide caption

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Claire Spottiswoode

A male Greater Honeyguide in Mozambique's Niassa Special Reserve.

Claire Spottiswoode

Honeyguides are wild birds that team up with humans and then lead them to honey. Researchers recently found that the calls these birds respond to are unique and tied to their location. For example, honeyguides in one area in Tanzania respond much more to whistles than to trills — but the opposite is true for honeyguides in Mozambique.

NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce talks about this relationship and shares how researchers followed honeyguides to learn about their call behaviors.

Read Nell's full story here.

Hear about an amazing wildlife phenomenon? Email us at shortwave@npr.org.

Listen to Short Wave on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts.

This episode was produced by Berly McCoy, edited by Rebecca Ramirez and fact checked by Brit Hanson. The audio engineer was Josh Newell.