Sarah T. Stewart: A giant impact that explains the origins of the Earth and Moon Everything in the solar system is made of different rocks and materials, except the Earth and Moon. They're like twins. It's a mystery that planetary scientist Sarah T. Stewart set out to solve.

The Earth and Moon are twins! A discovery that explains their origin

The Earth and Moon are twins! A discovery that explains their origin

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Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Doppelgangers.

Everything in the solar system is made of different rocks and materials, except the Earth and Moon. They're like twins. It's a mystery that planetary scientist Sarah T. Stewart set out to solve.

About Sarah T. Stewart

Sarah T. Stewart is a Professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at UC Davis. A planetary scientist and MacArthur Fellow, she specializes in the study of collisions in the solar system and directs the Shock Compression Laboratory, which uses light gas guns to study shock waves in planetary materials. Stewart is best known for proposing a new model for the origin of the moon.

This segment of the TED Radio Hour was produced by Matthew Cloutier and edited by Sanaz Meshkinpour and Manoush Zomorodi. You can follow us on Facebook @TEDRadioHour and email us at TEDRadioHour@npr.org.