McConnell Releases His Grip On Power : Consider This from NPR Here in the US, the average age of retirement is 61. Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky passed that birthday more than 20 years ago. And on Wednesday afternoon, he announced that while he still isn't ready to retire just yet, he will no longer lead Republicans in the Senate.

McConnell says he still has "enough gas" in the tank to thoroughly disappoint his critics. The soon-to-be former leader intends to serve out the rest of his term which continues through January 2027.

McConnell's Congressional career began back in 1984 when Ronald Reagan was President. The Kentucky republican has long embraced Reagan's conservatism and view of American exceptionalism.

Today's Republican party is one Mitch McConnell played a key role in shaping. Yet as he gets ready to step down from leadership, McConnell seems out of step with the direction the party is heading.

For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.


McConnell Releases His Grip On Power

McConnell Releases His Grip On Power

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U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) departs the Senate chamber on the day he announced he would step down as Republican leader in November. McConnell is the longest serving Senate leader in history, and leaves a wide-ranging and complex legacy behind. Nathan Howard/Getty Images hide caption

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Nathan Howard/Getty Images

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) departs the Senate chamber on the day he announced he would step down as Republican leader in November. McConnell is the longest serving Senate leader in history, and leaves a wide-ranging and complex legacy behind.

Nathan Howard/Getty Images

Here in the US, the average age of retirement is 61. Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky passed that birthday more than 20 years ago. And on Wednesday afternoon, he announced that while he still isn't ready to retire just yet, he will no longer lead Republicans in the Senate.

McConnell says he still has "enough gas" in the tank to thoroughly disappoint his critics. The soon-to-be former leader intends to serve out the rest of his term which continues through January 2027.

McConnell's Congressional career began back in 1984 when Ronald Reagan was President. The Kentucky republican has long embraced Reagan's conservatism and view of American exceptionalism.

Today's Republican party is one Mitch McConnell played a key role in shaping. Yet as he gets ready to step down from leadership, McConnell seems out of step with the direction the party is heading.

For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Megan Lim. It was edited by Courtney Dorning. Sami Yenigun is our executive producer.