This right wing conspiracy theory about eating bugs is about as racist as you think : Code Switch Gene Demby and NPR's Huo Jingnan dive into a conspiracy theory about how "global elites" are forcing people to eat bugs. And no huge surprise — the theory's popularity is largely about its loudest proponents' racist fear-mongering.

This right wing conspiracy theory about eating bugs is about as racist as you think

This right wing conspiracy theory about eating bugs is about as racist as you think

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The conspiracy theory alleges that a shadowy global elite conspires to control the world's population, in part by forcing them to eat insects. Kyle Ellingson for NPR hide caption

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Kyle Ellingson for NPR

The conspiracy theory alleges that a shadowy global elite conspires to control the world's population, in part by forcing them to eat insects.

Kyle Ellingson for NPR

"I will not eat the bugs" became a meme on 4chan and emerged in conservative talk shows and political speech. But why has it gained traction? In this week's Code Switch, Gene Demby and NPR reporter Huo Jingnan dive into the sprawling conspiracy theory behind it. Proponents of the theory lean on the anti-semitic trope that "global elites" have a plot to control the masses — in this case under the guise of climate change solutions — by forcing them to eat bugs.