The April Solar Eclipse Means Business : 1A If you're just now planning travel for next week's total solar eclipse, you may be a little behind.

Hotels are booked up and campgrounds are sold out in and around towns in the eclipse's path of totality.

Nearly 4 million people are expected to make the trip to the viewing zone which stretches from Maine to Texas.

Local businesses are taking advantage of the extra foot traffic, from hosting watch parties to rolling out solar eclipse-themed menus.

How are cities and local businesses preparing for the spending boom? And what should you do to prepare if you plan on traveling to see the solar event?

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.

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The April Solar Eclipse Means Business

The April Solar Eclipse Means Business

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In this photo illustration, eclipse glasses from Warby Parker are seen on a table in New York City. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

In this photo illustration, eclipse glasses from Warby Parker are seen on a table in New York City.

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

If you're just now planning travel for next week's total solar eclipse, you may be a little behind.

Hotels are booked up and campgrounds are sold out in and around towns in the eclipse's path of totality. Nearly 4 million people are expected to make the trip to the viewing zone which stretches from Maine to Texas.

Emergency preparations are underway in anticipation of the surge in travel. But planning for the worst has been accompanied by a spending boom in affected areas.

Local businesses are taking advantage of the extra foot traffic, from hosting watch parties to rolling out solar eclipse-themed menus. According to an estimate from The Perryman Group, Texas alone could rake in $428 million in eclipse-related spending.

How are cities and local businesses preparing for the spending boom? And what should you do to prepare if you plan on traveling to see the solar event?

Find more of our programs online. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.