How do defense attorneys select an impartial jury when their client is famous? : Consider This from NPR On Monday, former President Donald Trump will enter a Manhattan courtroom for his first criminal trial. But before a verdict can be rendered a jury must be selected. And for Trump's legal team that is going to be a challenge.

A small number of attorneys have faced a similar challenge — how do you select an impartial jury when your client is famous?

Host Scott Detrow speaks with attorney Camille Vasquez for insight into the art of jury selection in such a case. She represented Johnny Depp in his defamation suit against his ex-wife Amber Heard.

For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

How do defense attorneys select an impartial jury when their client is famous?

How do defense attorneys select an impartial jury when their client is famous?

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An empty jury box Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel/MCT/Landov

An empty jury box

Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel/MCT/Landov

On Monday, former President Donald Trump will enter a Manhattan courtroom for his first criminal trial. But before a verdict can be rendered a jury must be selected. And for Trump's legal team that is going to be a challenge.

A small number of attorneys have faced a similar challenge — how do you select an impartial jury when your client is famous?

Host Scott Detrow speaks with attorney Camille Vasquez for insight into the art of jury selection in such a case. She represented Johnny Depp in his defamation suit against his ex-wife Amber Heard.

For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Tyler Bartlam and edited by Adam Raney. Our executive producers are Beth Donovan and Sami Yenigun. Eric Marrapodi is NPR's Vice President of News Programming.