Entrepreneurs want to reflect sunlight to cool the planet. There are big risks. : Up First From brightening ocean clouds to launching sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere, some entrepreneurs and scientists are testing technology that could reflect sunlight back into space to combat global warming. There's evidence some types of solar geoengineering could lower global temperatures a lot. But along with potential benefits come huge potential risks. Experts say the science isn't settled and regulations aren't keeping up. Today on The Sunday Story, a journey into the world of solar geoengineering.

The Sunday Story: Startups want to cool Earth by reflecting sunlight

The Sunday Story: Startups want to cool Earth by reflecting sunlight

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Andrew Song and Luke Iseman of Make Sunsets ready for a launch. Julia Simon/NPR hide caption

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Julia Simon/NPR

Andrew Song and Luke Iseman of Make Sunsets ready for a launch.

Julia Simon/NPR

From brightening ocean clouds to launching sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere, some entrepreneurs and scientists are testing technology that could reflect sunlight back into space to combat global warming. There's evidence some types of solar geoengineering could lower global temperatures a lot. But along with potential benefits come huge potential risks. Experts say the science isn't settled and regulations aren't keeping up. Today on The Sunday Story, a journey into the world of solar geoengineering.


This episode was produced by Abby Wendle and edited by Jenny Schmidt and Neela Banerjee. It was engineered by Robert Rodriguez.

We'd love to hear from you. Send us an email at TheSundayStory@npr.org.

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