House Democratic leaders say they would help save Speaker Johnson's job Democrats have been telegraphing for weeks their willingness to help Mike Johnson — a Republican — keep his job as speaker if members of his own party trigger a vote to oust him.

House Democratic leaders say they would help save Speaker Johnson's job

House Democratic Leader Hakeem Jeffries and Speaker of the House Mike Johnson are seen here attending a congressional tribute in the rotunda of the U.S. Capitol for retired Army Col. Ralph Puckett Jr. on April 29. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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House Democratic Leader Hakeem Jeffries and Speaker of the House Mike Johnson are seen here attending a congressional tribute in the rotunda of the U.S. Capitol for retired Army Col. Ralph Puckett Jr. on April 29.

Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

House Democratic leaders say they'll help House Speaker Mike Johnson keep his job if members of his own party make a move to oust him.

"From the very beginning of this Congress, House Democrats have put people over politics and found bipartisan common ground with traditional Republicans in order to deliver real results. At the same time, House Democrats have aggressively pushed back against MAGA extremism," House Minority Leader Hakeem Jeffries, Caucus Chair Pete Aguilar and Minority Whip Katherine Clark said in a joint statement.

"We will vote to table Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene's Motion to Vacate the Chair. If she invokes the motion, it will not succeed."

In March, Greene filed a motion to vacate the speaker over frustrations with his leadership, saying he gave Democrats too much in spending deals. Two other Republicans have since signed on to her effort. But Greene hasn't yet triggered a vote.

Democrats have been telegraphing the idea that they could save Johnson, following the passage of Ukraine aid, something blocs of House Republicans remain opposed to.

Johnson reacted to the news in real time during a press conference following the GOP conference meeting Tuesday morning.

"First I've heard of it," he said. "What the country needs right now is a functioning Congress. They need a Congress that works well works together and does not hamper its own ability to solve these problems."

He said he did not have any conversation with Jeffries before the national security supplemental came to a vote about whether he could count on Democratic support if a motion to vacate was brought to the floor.

"I've had colleagues from both parties come up to me on the floor, of course, and say we won't stand for this," he said. "I've not requested assistance from anyone."