Why Colorado towns and farms are spending a hundred million for a power station : The Indicator from Planet Money In Western Colorado, towns and farms are banding together to pay a hundred million dollars for water they don't intend to use. Today on the show, how scarcity, climate change and a first-dibs system of water management is forcing towns, farms and rural residents to get spendy.

Related episodes:
A watershed moment in the West? (Apple / Spotify)
The Amazon, the Colorado River and a price on nature
Water in the West: Bankrupt?

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How Colorado towns are trying to get some water certainty

How Colorado towns are trying to get some water certainty

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The Shoshone Generating Station, a hydroelectric power plant on the Colorado River east of Glenwood Canyon. (Alex Hager, KUNC) Alex Hager/KUNC hide caption

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Alex Hager/KUNC

The Shoshone Generating Station, a hydroelectric power plant on the Colorado River east of Glenwood Canyon. (Alex Hager, KUNC)

Alex Hager/KUNC

In Western Colorado, towns and farms are banding together to pay a hundred million dollars for water they don't intend to use. Today on the show, how scarcity, climate change and a first-dibs system of water management is forcing towns, farms and rural residents to get spendy.

Related episodes:
A watershed moment in the West? (Apple / Spotify)
The Amazon, the Colorado River and a price on nature
Water in the West: Bankrupt?

For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.