Mark Forsyth: Why the founding fathers chose the word "president" When George Washington took power, the U.S. House and Senate debated tirelessly how to address him. Writer Mark Forsyth explains how and why the U.S. leader is called "president."

The humble beginning of the word "president"

TRH: Mark Forsyth

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Mark Forsyth: What's a snollygoster? A short lesson in political speak YouTube

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode The History Behind Three Words

When George Washington took power, the U.S. House and Senate debated tirelessly how to address him. Writer Mark Forsyth explains how and why the U.S. leader is called "president."

About Mark Forsyth

Mark Forsyth is the author of The Elements of Eloquence, The Etymologicon and A Short History of Drunkenness. He is the creator of The Inky Fool, a blog about words, phrases, grammar, rhetoric, and prose.

This segment of the TED Radio Hour was produced by Fiona Geiran and edited by Sanaz Meshkinpour. You can follow us on Facebook @TEDRadioHourand email us at TEDRadioHour@npr.org.

Web Resources

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